Protect Queensland's Migrating Whales

Protect Queensland's Migrating Whales

In 2019 alone, five whales were unnecessarily caught in Queensland’s Shark Control Program nets. As whales make their annual migration to Queensland’s warmer waters, we urgently need the nets removed. 

New South Wales has acknowledged the problem and now removes nets during whale migration season. Queensland is the only state left to still use these cruel practices in migratory paths and one of the few places in the world still targeting protected species of sharks. 

There is overwhelming evidence that shark nets and drumlines do nothing for swimmer safety. Yet, every year hundreds of marine animals are indiscriminately ...

In 2019 alone, five whales were unnecessarily caught in Queensland’s Shark Control Program nets. As whales make their annual migration to Queensland’s warmer waters, we urgently need the nets removed. 

New South Wales has acknowledged the problem and now removes nets during whale migration season. Queensland is the only state left to still use these cruel practices in migratory paths and one of the few places in the world still targeting protected species of sharks. 

There is overwhelming evidence that shark nets and drumlines do nothing for swimmer safety. Yet, every year hundreds of marine animals are indiscriminately injured or killed by Queensland’s shark culling program. In addition to whales, many of the animals that are caught are untargeted species like turtles, dolphins, rays and harmless species of shark. 

The 2017 Senate Inquiry into “Shark mitigation and deterrent measures” which made comprehensive recommendations for non-lethal technologies remains largely ignored.

As other states upgrade to modern shark control technology, Queensland is sticking with an ineffective program it’s had in place since 1962. Since then tens of thousands of animals have unnecessarily been killed by this shark culling program. Vulnerable and harmless species are being inhumanely executed in their own natural environment. 

Queensland knows these practices are outdated and the public want modern swimmer safety programs that are safe for humans and marine life including whales. We need Queensland’s Shark Control Program to use non-lethal alternatives in order to protect marine life as well as ensure the safety of swimmers. 

 

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Email the Queensland Fisheries Minister

Send a message to the Queensland Minister for Fisheries the Hon Mark Furner, asking him to remove all shark nets and drumlines during the whale migration season and look to replace the program with modern, non-lethal shark bite mitigation measures.

 

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